EOS x-ray

Radiography is the imaging of body structures using x-rays, which are a form of radiation similar to visible light, radiowaves and microwaves.
Download the Patient Info Sheet (PDF)

What is EOS x-ray?

EOS is an advanced 2D and 3D imaging system that specifically addresses the unique needs of healthcare professionals in the field of orthopaedics - capturing full-body, frontal & lateral images particularly spine, hips and knees.

EOS is an imaging device that combines a Nobel prize-winning particle detector and an innovative linear scanning technique. With these two technologies, EOS allows for whole body, frontal and lateral images to be acquired simultaneously with significant reduction compared to conventional radiography.

How do I prepare for an EOS x-ray?

No specific preparation is required for an EOS x-ray. You must however bring the x-ray request form or referral letter from your doctor, as no x-ray examination can be performed without it.

• Please inform the radiographer who is performing the x-ray if there is any chance you may be pregnant. Safety of the patient and unborn child is the number one priority so a different approach or test may be needed. As some clothing can make it difficult to see the images clearly, you may be asked to wear a gown.

• Be prepared to remove certain items like watches, necklaces and certain types of clothing that contain metal objects such as zips, as these items may interfere with the quality of the image.

What happens during an EOS x-ray?

The radiographer (a trained x-ray technologist) will escort you through to an examination room. They will explain the procedure and prepare you accordingly.

An entire body scan takes approximately 20 seconds for an adult and about 15 seconds for a child. It is important that you stay completely still when the radiographer instructs you to, as any movement may create a blurred image.

After the x-rays have been performed, the radiographer has to process each x-ray and check the results for quality. This can sometimes take several minutes. Sometimes there will be a need for additional images to be taken to obtain more information to help the radiologist make a diagnosis. There is no need for concern if this happens as it is quite common. Micro-dose is used for follow up and offers peace of mind for conditions requiring repeated scans for progress and monitoring such as scoliosis and lower limb orthopaedic conditions.

The radiographer will instruct you when the procedure is finished.

How long do EOS x-rays take?

An entire body scan takes approximately 20 seconds for an adult and about 15 seconds for a child. It is important that you stay completely still when the radiographer instructs you to, as any movement may create a blurred image.

What are the risks of an EOS x-ray?

Generally, the benefit of the EOS x-ray procedure is far more important than the small estimated risk. At the radiation dose levels that are used in diagnostic radiography there is little or no evidence of health effects.

Radiation dose in EOS x-ray imaging is reduced by 50% compared to digital radiology (DR) system, 85% compared to computered radiology (CR) system and 95% less than basic CT scans.

How do I get my results?

Your doctor will receive a written report on your test as soon as is practicable.

It is very important that you discuss the results with the doctor whom referred you so that they can explain what the results mean for you.

How much will my procedure cost?

Fees for radiology procedures vary and depend on a number of factors, including the type of procedure, what has been requested on your referral and the Medicare rebates available. We will advise you of any fees associated with your examination at the time of making your appointment or when you arrive at the clinic. Alternatively you can contact us and one of our team will be happy to answer any queries regarding fees. For more information about fees and rebates please visit our account FAQs.

Complementary Content
${loading}